Friday, 31 July 2020

Decauville

Another month has gone by and despite the current semi-lock-down I've not managed any modelling to report. Normally this time of year would feature a visit to the Amberley railway gala, but that of course was cancelled along with every other railway gala and exhibition. What's more, although some preserved railways have been able to open with some kind of service it is unlikely I'll be visiting many this year. So I have prescribed myself some (mail order) retail therapy...


It's a Minitrains Decauville "Progress" 0-6-0 tank, which I rather like the look of, but missed the first batch. I chose the red as I think it suited this loco best, and although it may be a little on the small side (I guess it is HO, but Minitrains can be variable in scale) I think it looks quite at home on Loctern Quay. I expect it will be seen hauling passengers to Hexworthy in due course too.


Like all Minitrains locos it runs smoothly, albeit with the motor and flywheel visible in the cab from some angles. I will have to get a (short) loco crew to distract from it. However, my biggest challenge will be fitting Microtrains couplings with their large draft box, and no space behind the buffer beams. 

The above photos were taken on my phone, and look somewhat bright - the red loco looks quite orange. By contrast the photo below was taken on a "proper" camera and I think is closer to true colour, here you can also see the working headlight. 


Tuesday, 30 June 2020

More stonework, slates, and slabs at Hexworthy

Since my last post I have revisited the stonework of the bridge and walls, touching in some stones with lighter shades of brown to lighten and increase the variation in tone. I think I overdid the washes to unify the colours which were too dark. The effect is subtle, probably the tone could be a little lighter still, but I am much happier.


Looking at photos of the real bridge I decided to add some lichen using dry-brushing of mint green paint, yes that really is the colour seen on the real thing (see the last post), and a hint of darker moss green at the base. 


The little culvert also looks lighter now.


The station stonework looked a little "fresh" by comparison, so I went over the mortar with more weathering powder/talc mixture but this time slightly more brown in colour. It is surprising the effect this has had in changing the tone of the building. I also painted the roof 


You may notice a few other changes to the station. 

I painted the roof - after finding building Loctern Quay that the York Modelmaking slates although grey paper, benefited from painting, I used the same approach here. Individual tiles were picked out in a few shades of grey-blue, then the whole roof given a wash of mid grey - this colours any remaining tiles and tones it all together. Perhaps the variation is too much here, but to me it looks much better than the plain uniform grey before, and hand cut slates can vary in colour much more than modern manufactured slates. 


The platforms last seen being laid from individually cut slabs has been painted. I started with a waft of Halfords grey primer, painted a similar grey with a slight hint of beige, then picked out a few slabs in slightly different shades - much less variation here though. A wash of thin beige and more weathering powders to fill any gaps finished the job. 

The other change is the addition of the canopy, made from some valance I had in stock (possibly Slaters) and plasticard, it has wire (paperclip) rods set into it that poke into holes in the foam building walls through into the foam-core of the intermediate floor. Although just a push-fit for now as it needs painting 


A little way to go with the ground coverings but the station area is starting to take shape. 

Sunday, 14 June 2020

Stonework at Hexworthy

Unlike many I have been fully occupied of late - I'm not complaining, but modelling time has been more limited than expected. Slow progress has been made though with the stonework around Hexworthy - scribing and painting. The wall and bridge had been cut from foam (polystyrene pizza bases) for some time, finally I have scribed the stonework into it. 

The small space behind it looked empty, there's supposed to be a road and another wall, so I added a second wall behind it. As you can see from the close-up this wall is far too close, the road is only about a scale 3' to 4' wide, but from normal angles this isn't obvious so I hope the subterfuge works. With a gate, and a few trees and bushes hanging over the wall the transition to flat back-scene should look more natural. I've also added a water tower, actually a resin casting from Anyscale Models; a nice size tank and the stonework matches well but it was rather low, so I made a coaling platform for it to stand on. (Ignore the brass weight holding the wall upright in place for now).


One area I am unsure of is the painting of the stonework. I used acrylics with a grey coat mixed with PVA to strengthen the foam, onto which individual stones were picked out, unified with a thin wash, then the mortar added from weathering powders mixed with talc. The effect looks OK, but it is perhaps a little dark, and looks much darker brown than the station.

[url=https://flic.kr/p/W6nhyG]IMG_3520

The real stonework colour of course varies with ambient lighting and weather, moss and damp, so hard to say. 


The roadway is also foam, with talc sprinkled over the wet grey paint. It's not come out as well as when Gordon Gravett does it...


The little bridge has also had the stone treatment. Again, I think too dark?

Monday, 11 May 2020

The Vale of Rheidol Railway

Just as lock-down got under way I got a new book by Peter Johnson - The Vale of Rheidol Railway.


This is an unusual narrow gauge railway, unlike most Welsh lines it's main traffic has always been tourist passengers. Yes it did carry goods and minerals when built, but tourism was the main driver for it's construction, and what kept it going through five different owners - including British Rail, who didn't close it but kept it running into the 1980's. Although it had a limited variety of locos and stock compared to some lines, and perhaps takes less of the limelight, it is an interesting railway in beautiful scenery.


The book is written in Peter's usual chronological story-line style, similar to that used in his recent book on the Corris railway and before that, his books on the Ffestiniog Railway, and the Great Western Narrow Gauge Railways. The latter book did of course cover the Vale of Rheidol since the GWR was one of it's owners, but in this book Peter is able to go much more deeply into the history of the line - which starts with the early proposals, takes us through construction and early years, ownership by the Cambrian, British Railways/Rail, and into private ownership in recent times.


There are many photographs giving a flavour of the line through the ages, including a few in recent years, although the majority are period and therefore black and white.Reproduction is excellent, the book is of good quality and the text is clear and well written. Peter is able to make history interesting and easy to read. Modellers may be disappointed that there are no drawings of locos or stock (though there are some excellent photos). There are some maps but the only track-plans are period documents showing the changes at Aberystwyth, and while there are lots of photos of the trains and scenery there are surprisingly few of the stations or facilities (perhaps unsurprising for a tourist railway).


So like the Corris book this isn't a definitive volume, but it is a complete story of the line to date, an enjoyable read and a good pictorial record of this attractive railway. So a good way to spend some time in lock-down!

Thursday, 7 May 2020

Loctern Quay is a winner!

Just got the latest 009 News...


Loctern Quay is the winner of the 009 Society competition!

Friday, 24 April 2020

Platform Paving

It was waaay back at the end of July when I last posted about progress with Hexworthy, when I had cut the platforms from 3mm foam-core board, and was experimenting with the idea of paving using individually cut "slabs" of 40-thou plasticard.


So with Loctern Quay finished, time to get back to making paving slabs. I lightly sanded the slabs for a  less smooth surface, and cut it strips, marking them by scoring with the calipers to ensure they are consistent and parallel. I then used my cheap "chopper" to trim them to length, the red quadrant on the right is being used to clamp a piece of plastic to act as a stop so all the pieces are cut the same length.


The large slabs are 3' x 2' (12mm x 8mm), and smaller ones 2' x 18" (8mm x 6mm). I used the large ones to line the edges of the platform, including the bay, while the smaller ones fill in the surface around the station building. They are stuck down to the foam-core surface (which is a thin layer of card) with Bostik impact adhesive. The rest of the platform will be gravel (sand) for variety, and to save time!


I decided to run the paving parallel to the station, which saved fiddly half-slabs. I was left with about a 2mm gap to fill with part slabs, so I cheated and trimmed it back to the whole slab! I made a step for the door to the goods shed/cafe too.


In the close up you can seen I've done a little more sanding to the surface after laying the slabs to give texture, yet there is still a slight unevenness and irregularity that looks quite effective. I'm quite pleased with the result and it didn't take as long as I thought it might. It just needs painting now.


You can also see the stonework face of the platform, which is simply embossed into the edge of the foam-core board. From this angle it looks like the platform is lifting slightly, though some heavy books on it when I come to glue it in place should sort that.

Friday, 17 April 2020

British Steam Locomotive Builders

British Steam Locomotive Builders by James W. Lowe, and published by Pen & Sword, is a pretty hefty book. It's about the size of an old family bible, and pretty heavy too, but with 700 pages of fine print it is full of information. It provides an index of British steam locomotive builders from the earliest days of experimental machines, through the Victorian era and into the Grouping, up to the days of British Rail.


Although a new release from Pen & Sword it is actually an old book, originally printed in 1975 as steam locomotive building came to an end - except of course in preservation or tourism, which is excluded. As well as the railway companies themselves, locos were built by many independent companies which are listed - from those that built just one loco and most will never have heard of, to those more familiar names such as Hunslet, North British, and Beyer Peackock, that built many thousands for domestic and oversees use. That of course includes narrow gauge locomotives as well as standard, and even broad gauge, and locos for industrial and minor lines as well as main lines and public railways.


As such the level of detail for each company varies from a few paragraphs, some have tables listing all locos built, for others this would be impossible and their output could fill a book on their own, but main types and developments are listed or described. Railway company works are listed by site. As well as tables, the book is peppered with photos showing a few locomotives built, though of course these are just a tiny sample. The text does document some of the key developments in technology by some of the loco builders, and how they evolved through mergers and acquisition to form new companies. I cannot say how complete it is, no doubt some small loco builders could have been missed, but I would guess it is as complete as any such volume could be.


As a reprint of a 45 year old book and because of it's size, printed on ordinary book paper (i.e. not glossy), the photos are not of high quality. I guess the printers did not go back to the originals. However, this does not detract from the usefulness of the book, which is intended as a reference and interesting study of the loco builders. There is an index which looks potentially useful.


My interest in narrow gauge means I was familiar with a number of loco builders, so I found this very interesting - but was still surprised at the number and variety of loco builders in the "golden age" of steam locomotives. Perhaps it's not light reading and yes it is more of a reference, but if you have an interest in steam locomotives this is well worth having, browsing, and keeping for a spot of research.